AUTOSTRETCHING EVJENTH PDF

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Autostretching. The Complete Manual of Specific Stretching - kaywretinjourbo.gqh, J. Hamberg - dokument [*.pdf] Create PDF files without this message by. MUSCLE STRETCHING IN MANUAL THERAPY A CLINICAL MANUAL,, The Extremities -- Volume I Olaf Evjenth & Jern Hamberg ALFTA REHAB Olaf Evjenth & Jern Hamberg MUSCLE STRETCHING IN MANUAL THERAPY A Clinical Manual Muscle stretching years ago, Statue from Bangkok. Autostretching: The Complete Manual of Specific Stretching Hardcover – January 1, Muscle Stretching in Manual Therapy: A Clinical Manual: The Extremities,. Muscle Stretching in Manual Therapy: A Clinical Manual, The Spinal Column and Tempro.


Autostretching Evjenth Pdf

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Autostretching: the complete manual of specific by Olaf Evjenth. Autostretching : the complete manual of specific stretching. by Olaf Evjenth; Jern Hamberg. Auto Stretching: Complete Manual of Specific Training by Olaf Evjenth; Jern Hambers at kaywretinjourbo.gq - ISBN - ISBN . MUSCLE STRETCHING IN MANUAL THERAPY A CLINICAL MANUAL,,The Extremities --Volume IOlaf Evjenth & Jern HambergALF DOWNLOAD PDF.

During the period September to December , patients with OA of the hip were referred by orthopedic surgeons or rheumatologists to the outpatient clinic of the physical therapy department with complaints due to OA of the hip. Assessment of the criteria was performed by the referring physician. The study was approved by the medical ethics committee of the hospital and all participants provided written informed consent.

To optimize prognostic similarity, prestratification was conducted for radiographic severity. A staff member not involved in the trial prepared the numbered, nontransparent, sealed envelopes.

Permutated blocks were used to optimize equal distribution of patients between the 2 intervention groups.

I and autostretching by olaf evjenth and jern hamberg

A random sequence of permutated blocks of 6 envelopes was generated by using random number tables. Treatment and measurements. Treatment started within 1 week of baseline.

All patients received treatment at the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of the hospital. At baseline, all participants completed a questionnaire containing questions on demographic variables, previous complaints, duration of symptoms, cointerventions, and previous treatment with exercise therapy or manual therapy.

The use of medication and other treatment was recorded at each assessment. Measurements were performed at baseline week 0 , after the treatment period week 5 , and after 3 months week 17 and 6 months week This was done because we believe that this measure, due to the long period between the followup measurements 12 weeks , would not be memorized by patients in a correct way.

The use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and pain medication prior to the trial was allowed if it was left unchanged during the study period. Other treatment by health professionals, such as occupational therapists, was to be avoided. A single assessor HLH , who was blinded to the allocation of treatment programs, carried out all measurements.

Patients were instructed by a secretary not to give information about the allocated treatment to the assessor. Furthermore, the assessor was not allowed to visit the physical therapy department during treatment hours to further assure blinding. Also, all measurements were performed at a location separate from the physical therapy department, on a different floor of the hospital. Finally, the assessor was asked to guess the assigned treatment directly after posttreatment measurements 5 weeks.

Three manual therapists and 3 physical therapists performed all treatments. The manual therapists were licensed manual therapists. The physical therapists did not receive training in manual therapy or in manipulation techniques.

All participating physical therapists were instructed in training sessions. These training sessions were repeated every 3 months. All patients were treated twice weekly for a period of 5 weeks with a total of 9 treatments.

The first treatment session was used to tailor the treatment protocol to the individual patient. The Spinal Mouse, an automatically-measuring device for spinal segmental motions, was dragged down from C7 to S3, sagitally, along the vertebral column of subjects in three postures of vertebral extension, flexion and lateral flexion.

The data recorded of the spinal segments, was then transferred wirelessly to a computer. The measurements included the length of the spine, degree of scoliosis, and the angles of each segment of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. For the measurement of spinal segmental motion, the subjects were asked to adopt a neutral posture, which is the most comfortable position for the waist.

While maintaining the neutral posture, the segmental motion of the spine was measured from C7 to S3. Next, segmental spine motion was measured in the same way, while the trunk was actively flexed to the maximum.

The measurements were repeated three times and the mean value was calculated. A single examiner took measurements in order to minimize the margin of error of the test.

An isometric sthenometer ISO-check, Germany was used to measure the muscular strength of the lumbar deep muscles. The maximum and average muscular strengths were obtained by measuring isometric contraction.

Subject sat on the device and the knees and chest were secured with straps. Then, lumbar flexion, extension, lateral flexion and rotation were measured.

Lumbar flexion or extension was measured by pushing the lumbar region maximally in the direction of flexion or extension while holding the chest belt tightly. Lateral flexion was measured by pushing the fixed shoulder bar with maximum force, while rotation was measured by rotating the lumbar spine with maximum force while holding the fixed handle.

The maximum muscular force was measured in each direction for six seconds, and the force is reported in Nm. For the purpose of strengthening the transverse abdominis muscle, multifidus muscle, quadratus lumborum muscle, external oblique abdominal muscle, and internal oblique abdominal muscle, subjects performed active stabilization exercises for one hour daily, three times a week for twelve weeks. The stabilization exercises were divided into warming-up, main, and cool-down exercises. The warming-up exercise was walking on a treadmill for fifteen minutes.

The cool-down exercise included three types of stretching exercise. The main exercise included 3 types of workouts in 1 set and 3 sets were performed.

The exercises were repeated 15 times for one set and 3 sets were performed with 2-minute rest intervals between them. A slow exercise speed was used so that subjects did not experience pain. The cool-down exercises were comprised of stretching exercises for the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring muscle, and the peroneal muscle group The main exercise of the stabilization workout program was performed with the aim of promoting the muscular strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle and the hamstring muscle.

Before starting the exercises, subjects pulled-in their abdomens so that a ball on the back did not sink down core muscles were contracted. For Exercise 1 , the subjects were asked not to push the medial aspect of the thighs, so that no force was put on a small ball placed between the knees, and then flexed and extended the knees slowly as if pushing against a wall. Exercise 2 : Subjects alternately raised their upper and lower extremities in a prone position.

When raising the upper and lower extremities, the pelvis and the chest had to be in contact with the ground, with the lumbar spine not overly extended. This procedure was performed alternately on both the left and right sides.

Exercise 3 : Subjects flexed their knees and placed their hands on the neck area in a supine position, then vertically raised their elbows up to the level of the scapula, lifting the upper body. Then, the upper body was slowly brought down while maintaining the core contraction.

Exercise 4 : Subjects flexed their knees and elbows at 90 degrees while lying on a bench. Then, they rotated their arms while pushing their elbows back to the limit of movement of the shoulder joints and contracted the rhomboid muscle.

Exercise 5 : Subjects stood with their legs shoulder-width apart in a walking position. Then, they lowered the pelvis by flexing the knees, and raised, the pelvis extending the knees.

This exercise was performed with the leading leg alternated. This is an endurance exercise for the femoral and gluteal muscles, and is an effective workout that must be carried out in with the core muscles contracted.

Exercise 6 : The subjects bent both knees to 90 degrees to a decubitus position. Stimulation of Antagonists: T re ta ins ri ght -hand grip. T th e n as ks P to move furth e r in th e d irecti o n of stretchin g. Th e rapy for th e rhomboidei major and minor. P prolle. T: Standing at head of co uch.

Auto Stretching: Complete Manual of Specific Training

G rip: T"s left ha nd on p 's right scapu la. T" s right ha nd steadi es p's tho rax from P's left. Start in g Posit"ioll. T gra duall y and maxima ll y pushes in a IOlerol. P ma y bc trc ate dlyin g o n side : sec fo llowi ng 'cchn ique.

T he rapy for the rhomboidei major and minor. P Iyillg all side. T: Sta nd in g a nd ha lf silti ng o n couch. T" s right hand grips p's upper arm a t th e sho ul de r.

Procedure: Using' thi s g rip. Stimulation of Antagonists: T re tains g rip. T the n as ks P to move furth e r in th e directi o n of stre tching. T herapy for the triceps brachii , long head.

INTRODUCTION

Starting Position: P: Sil1ing; sho ulde r fu ll y fle xed a nd add ucted wit h elbow fl exed. T: Sta nding fa ci ng p's left side.

Grip: T's right hand gri ps P's forearm above th e wrist. T's left hand stab ili zes latera l side of p' s shoulder. T's left hand grips p's fore a rm above the wrist. T's ri ght hand stabilizes p's uppe r arm above the e lbow. St arting Position.

Procedure: Usin g thi s gr ip. T grad ua lly and fully flexes at P's e lbow. Stimulation of Antagonists: T retains gri p. T then as ks P to move further in the direction of st retchin g. Note: If T has difficulty stabili zin g P. Therapy for the triceps brachii , long head. Starting Position: 1': Lying o n ri ght side: shou lder ful lv flexed: head of couch raised so sho ulder is also fully adducted. T: Sta nding fac in g I' fro m front. Grip: Ts left hand g rips 1" , right forearm just above the wrist.

Procedure: Usin g this g rip. T graduall y and fully flexes at P's e lbow. Stimulation of Antagonists: T reta in s g rip.

T t hen asks I' to move furth e r in the direction o f stretchin g. I'J b. Final Pos it ion. Th e rapy for th e trapezius, ascending part. Starting Position: P: Lyin g o n le ft side; ri ght a rm be hind back. Grip: T's le ft hand grips late ral bo rde r a nd th e infe ri o r angle o f p 's scap ul a.

T's right hand grips the acromi on , co racoid p rocess a nd head o f hume rus. T's chest suppo rts e lbow. Procedure: Usin g this grip.

T gradu all y a nd maxim all y moves p's sca pul a in a cran ia l and medial directio n. Thi s produces a late ra l a nd sli ghtl y ca udal rotati o n o f th e gle no id cav it y. Stimulation of Antagonists: T move s left ha nd to uppe r medial an gle o f sca pula.

T the n as ks P to move furth e r in th e directio n of stre tching. The rapy fo r the serratus anterior. Starting Position: P: Sittin g. T: St anding at P's le ft side. Startin g Pos ition.

T grad ua ll y a nd maxim a ll y moves P's scapula in a crallial. Stimulation of Antagonists: T moves rig ht ha nd. T th e n asks P to move furthe r in the direction o f stre tching, and resists tha t move me nt with right hand to stimul ate p 's ant agonists. Th e rapy fo r the biceps brachii.

Starting Position : P: Lyin g o n left side: right uppe r a rm full y exte nded. Grip: T's left hand gri ps p's fo rea rm j ust above the wri s!.

T' s right ha nd stab ili zes p's upper a rm j ust above the e lbow. Startin g Posit ion. T gradu a ll y and full y exrellds at p 's e lbow.

Stimulation of Antagonists: T re ta ins g rip. T th e n as ks P to move funh e r in thc directi o n of stre tchin g. The rap y for t he supraspinatus. Starting Position: P: Lyi ng o n le ft sid e: right upper a rm slig htl y abd ucte d and ex te nded.

T : Standin g behind P. Grip: T s right ha nd grips p' s uppe r ann just above the e lbow. Procedure: Usi ng thi s g rip. T t he n as ks P to ve furth e r in th e dire ctio n of stre tchin g. Note: Th e deltoid , acromial part is also stre tched in this p rocedure.

Therapy fo r th e deltoid , clavicular part a nd the coracobrachialis. Starting Position: P: Sup in e : kn ecs a nd hips ncxcd to stabilize lum bar and th o racic regions a nd to preve nt lum ba r spin c lo rd osis: small.

T : Standing at hcad o f co uch. G rip: Us in g bo th ha nds.

T grips the mcd ial sides of p's elbows. Procedure: Us in g thi s gr ip. T thc n as ks P to move further in the d irect ion of stretc hing. Notes: Thi s proced urc may also bc performcd with P sitting. The pectora lis major a nd subscapularis a re also stre tched in t hi s procedurc.

Fina l Positio n. Therapy for t he biceps brachii , short head. Starting Position: P: Supine: th orax stabili zed to co uch with a be lt: uppe r a rm fully late rall y rot ated a nd fully ex te nded. T : Sitting or sta ndi ng at head of couch wit h left side agai nst p 's right sho ulde r.

Grip: T' s ri ght hand grips around dorsa l side of p's fo rear m ju st above th e wrist. T 's left hand grips d o rsa l-med ia l side of p's uppe r a rm ju st above the e lbow. Start in g Posit ioll. T grad ua ll y and fu ll y eXfellds at p's e lbow. Stimulation of Antagonists: T reta in s g ri p. T then asks P to move furthe r in the di rectio n o f str etching. Fin a l Positi o n. The rap y fo r th e subscapularis. T: Sta nding obliquely faci ng p 's rig ht side. Grip: T's left ha nd stabil izes p' s uppe r arm aga in st the couch.

T' s ri ght han d g rips medi al side o f p 's fo rearm just above th e wri st. A firm cushi o n pl aced und e r p's right scapu la will push hi s sho ul der gi rdl e ve ntrall y , thu s preve nting undue stra in o n th e pectoralis major. Th c rap y for thc trapezius, descending part. Starting Position : P: Supine: he ad and nec k in full vc ntra l and left lateral l1exion a nd right rotat io n: sho ulders at cdgc of hcad of co uch.

T: Standing at hcad of co uch : left sidc o f abd o mc n suppo rt s rig ht sidc of p 's head. Grip: T's left ha nd grips the dorsa l side of p's ncck.

T's right hand o n p 's ri ght sho uld e r. Procedure: Usin g this gr ip. T appl ies traction to P's neck while gradually and maxim all y pu shing p's sho ulde r in a calldal a nd dorsal direction. Stimulation of Antagonists: T moves ri ght hand. T then asks P to movc further in th e directi o n o f stre tching.. Note: Avoid a ny move mc nt s o f p 's head and neck ot hc r than the prescribed tracti o n ap pli ed. Starlin g Posit ion.

Vicwe d from bc low 2.T: Sta nding obliquely faci ng p 's rig ht side. In the OMT Kaltenborn-Evjenth Concept, biomechanical principles form the core of the analysis and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. Freddy M. This procedure was performed alternately on both the left and right sides.

Next, segmental spine motion was measured in the same way, while the trunk was actively flexed to the maximum.

Muscle Stretching in Manual Therapy: A Clinical Manual: The Extremities (5th Edition)

Furthermore, patients in the manual therapy group had significantly better outcomes on pain, stiffness, hip function, and range of motion. Th e pectoralis major and minor and th e teres major are a lso stretched in this procedure. Startin g Position. Cyriax and 1.

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